Gateway Gazette

Newest Aboriginal 'Pre-Cadets' Heading to the Front Line

OTTAWA – July 4, 2014 – The newest troop of the RCMP’s Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program (APTP) graduate today from the RCMP Academy, “Depot” Division, in Regina, Saskatchewan.

The 21 graduates will soon begin an eight-week assignment where they will work alongside police officers in Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachments near their home communities. The APTP offers Aboriginal Canadians between the ages of 19 and 29 the opportunity to get an inside look at daily police work.

“Not only will this experience help them as they pursue a career in policing, which we hope will be with the RCMP, it helps us,” said Chief Human Resources Officer, Daniel Dubeau. “The RCMP is aggressively hiring and we know the perspective and understanding Aboriginal officers bring as a result of their cultural experience helps us enhance our working relationships with Canada’s Aboriginal communities.”

Since its 1996 inception, 470 people have completed the program and more than half have gone on to apply to the RCMP. Approximately four dozen candidates have successfully become RCMP officers and about 20 are employed in other capacities within the organization.

“The APTP program absolutely confirmed for me that I wanted to join the RCMP,” said Cst. Maureen Greyeyes-Brant, who was in the 1999 APTP troop and now runs the program.

“I did my placement in Ottawa and had a chance to work in many different sections where I clearly saw the possibilities of where my career could go. After that, there was no question that the RCMP was for me.”

Over the last three weeks, the APTP candidates learned the basics in a variety of areas including:

  • the Criminal Code, interviewing, cultural diversity, finding and collecting evidence and appearing in Court;
  • rules regarding use of force, defensive techniques, risk assessment and handcuffing, escorting and searching subjects;
  • police driving techniques, radio communications, directing traffic and investigating collisions; and
  • preparation for the RCMP fitness test and an introduction to firearms.

The APTP troop members come from across the country and will be working the field portion of the program in detachments in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Visit the RCMP’s Recruiting website for more information on Aboriginal development programs.

Aboriginal-flyer_2014_en_11RCMP’s Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program Backgrounder

  • The Aboriginal Pre-Cadet Training Program (APTP) offers Canadian Aboriginal people aged 19 to 29 the opportunity to experience daily police work with the RCMP.
  • The 11-week program starts with a three-week training session at the RCMP Academy, Depot Division, in Regina, Saskatchewan.
  • Candidates attend 98 hours of training which includes:
  • 36 hours of Applied Police Skills programming that includes lecture and scenario-based training on topics such as the Criminal Code, interviewing, finding and collecting evidence and appearing in Court;
  • 12 hours of Police Defensive Tactics which includes the rules regarding use of force, defensive techniques, risk assessment and handcuffing, escorting and searching subjects;
  • eight hours of training in police driving techniques, radio communications, directing traffic and investigating collisions ; and
  • training in cultural diversity, drill, preparation for the RCMP fitness test and an introduction to firearms.
  • By the end of the training at Depot, candidates are expected to:
  • demonstrate a level of deportment – personal, professional and social – consistent with the core values of the RCMP;
  • work effectively as part of a policing team with colleagues, supervisors, clients, and partners in policing;
  • work with diverse communities and participate in creative and collaborative problem solving;
  • demonstrate sensitivity to and respect for the diverse individuals and groups within the community
    take responsibility for individual learning and development;
  • know the Criminal Code, RCMP policy and Code of Conduct sufficiently to ensure that good judgment is exercised responsibly and lawfully; and
  • communicate effectively orally and in writing.
  • After graduating from Depot, the candidates are assigned to an RCMP detachment in or near their home community where they have the unique opportunity to work alongside RCMP police officers for eight weeks.
  • This year, candidates will work in detachments in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • The activities and duties the participants experience during their eight- week posting will vary depending on the needs of the detachment, but will include crime prevention and community policing initiatives.
  • Once candidates have completed the program they have regular contact with the APTP manager who answers their questions, provides support and encourages them as they go through the RCMP’s police officer application process.
  • Basic requirements to apply for the APTP:
  • between 19 and 29 years of age,
  • First Nation, Métis or Inuit descent,
  • Canadian citizen,
  • be of good character,
  • able to pass an enhanced reliability security check,
  • in good physical condition,
  • possess a Canadian secondary school (high school) diploma or equivalent, and
  • possess and maintain a valid, unrestricted Canadian driver’s licence.
  • Since the inception of the program in 1996, 470 candidates have completed the program and on average about half have gone on to apply to the RCMP. Approximately four dozen candidates have successfully become police officers with the RCMP and about 20 are employed in other capacities within the RCMP.
  • Of the RCMP’s approximately 19,000 police officers across Canada, 7.9% self-identified as Aboriginal in 2013. The RCMP is committed to increasing the ranks of Aboriginal police officers to 10% to better represent the communities we serve across the country.

In fiscal year 2013/14, a total of 29 Aboriginal cadets were sent to Depot, more than double the year before.

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